Milkman by Anna Burns

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Hailing from Northern Ireland myself, I was looking forward immensely to reading this Man Booker Prize winning novel.  I was a little trepidatious however, having read both glowing reviews and this odd criticism of it being ‘hard going.’  Well the reviews I can now agree with, and the idea of it being hard going, I must disagree with.

In saying that, I understand how it came to be said.  Anna Burns writes in such a unique style, and in my humble opinion, there are moments where the stylistic devises take away from the story itself.  She is fond of the repetition of three, long lists of adjectives, in fact long lists of anything.   There are also no names in the book.  Everyone is called by a title, which I thought added greatly to the humour.

The novel is set in an unnamed town in Northern Ireland, where our 18-year-old female narrator lives with her mother and ‘wee sisters.’  She also has three older sisters who are all married and living nearby.   She goes running with third brother-in-law, and life then takes a strange turn when she is followed by a character by the name of Milkman.

We soon come to know that he is a paramilitary and the novel follows our narrator’s journey, as she tries to deal with the unwanted advances of Milkman, as well as contemplating her current life with ‘maybe-boyfriend.’ All this takes place during the many complications of the Troubles which form the constant dangerous undercurrent of this brilliant novel.

She tells us about the ‘beyond-the-pales;’ anyone who doesn’t fit in or follow the rules of the tribe (there are many of them in the town including herself.)  She also describes the different tribes, ‘the renouncers,’ and the ‘issue women’ who hold power in the town.

Violence is part of everyday life:

“The only time you’d call the police in my area would be if you were going to shoot them.”

There is plenty of humour thoughout, although it is dark humour indeed, but I found myself laughing out loud many times.  There are also plenty of incredibly touching moments throughout the novel, where there is hope that light and love can replace the utter darkness of the time.

The writing is sublime.  It is ironic, black, harsh and yet gentle too.  Honestly it is hard to describe its nuances and cadences.  Just read it and weep at its brilliance.

I adored this book.  There were several lovely moments between the main character and her mother and wee sisters, not to mention her third brother-in-law.

I felt frustrated and yet completely understood how and why our heroine felt powerless to change her situation, always wondering how bad it was going to get.   No spoilers so can’t say anymore than that!

I highly recommend this novel.  I could read it again and I intend to. I will probably get a whole lot more from it the second or third time around.  It is not light reading but oh, (sighs with sheer pleasure) it is so worth it.  Divine.

 

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Making Time to Read in 2019

Hello, dear followers.  Yes, I am still here!  I apologize sincerely for the lack of posts in 2018.  Not at all what I had intended.   You see, I was working extremely hard at developing my career in 2018, and this necessitated reading a lot of non-fiction for my work (I am an executive coach and trainer.)   Alas, this left little time for reading fiction.

This year I am going to make time to read fiction.  I intended to read so many books in 2018.  I can’t believe I haven’t yet read Kate Atkinson’s Transcription, or ‘Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine,’ by Gail Honeyman, two books I am SO looking forward to reading in 2019.

What I did read at the end of 2018 was The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Jackson.  Not at all my usual reading choice, but my 12 year-old niece could not believe it when I said I hadn’t read them, and promptly leant me all three books and requested my immediate opinion on completion!  I must say I was pleasantly surprised.  A gripping story, excellently told and I did enjoy it much more than I expected.

Over Christmas I read the final installment in Jeffrey Archer’s The Clifton Chronicles.  Once again, this is not my usual type of reading material, but long story short, I was given the 7th novel in the series as a present, so out of sheer stubborness,  I decided to read the other 6 books.  If you are looking for some light reading, it’s a good long family saga and will not tax the brain, but is no less enjoyable.  I thought the writing in the first few books of the series was deplorable, but I think the writing improves as the saga develops, and the 7th is by far my favourite.  It also has a few good twists along the way.

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So with great hope, I intend to try and read at least a book a month and post a review every couple of months.    I am starting with this year’s Man Booker Prize Winning novel, ‘Milkman’ by Anna Burns.   As I am from Belfast, this is one I am really looking forward to getting stuck into.  I will report back next month!

Any reading desires for 2019?  Please share thoughts and opinions.   Thank you and I wish you all a Happy New Year.