The Circle by Dave Eggers

the circle

Social Media.  Harmless fun or privacy nightmare?  If you have ever found yourself wondering whether you might be allowing too much of your private information to be shared, and maybe it’s not such a good thing, then reading this book may confirm your fears.

Mae Holland finds herself employed at one of the most prestigious internet companies in the world – The Circle.

The mission of The Circle is not just for everyone to be connected, but for total transparency.  This is done through various programmes such as SeaChange, where tiny lollipop size cameras are filming people all over the world unbeknown to them.

The campus is utopia.  Everything is “perfect.”   The company is run by ‘the three wise men’ who are only accessible to the elite.

Mae works diligently and obsessively to become part of this elite and this is where the thriller aspect of the novel kicks in.  The further into this murky world, of being seen and being accepted, Mae dives, the further into a dystopian nightmare she falls.

I found this novel a rollercoaster ride of fun and satire which posed some interesting questions such as, our right to privacy, where does your duty to others begin and end, and most interestingly is technology becoming more of a danger to our society than a help?

Some of Mae’s actions I found wholly implausible, not to mention the actions of some of the other characters in the book, but whilst the novel pushes the boundaries of reality at times, it is none the less an extremely enjoyable read.

I have had little or no time to read recently as is clearly evident from the lack of posts on my blog, so the fact I had this read in three days speaks for itself.  I apologize for my lack of posts and also that this one is short.  It’s been a crazy year so far.   I hope to be able to resume more reading and blogging in the near future.

This is a great read – holiday or not!  I would give it 8 out of 10.

 

 

 

Atomised by Michel Houellebecq

atomised

OK, so first off.  I now understand that you are not supposed to like this book.  It is supposed to be depressing and a vivid look at the dysfunctional state of society.  I wish I had known that before I started reading it!  Houellebecq is a French writer who does not shy away from any controversy.  He is nasty and dirty, and I am afraid as far from what I enjoy reading as you can get.

I read this book because Andy Miller wrote about it in ‘The Year of Reading Dangerously.’ He loved it so much, and as I thought his book was funny and clever, I decided to add it to my list.   Big Mistake. Huge.

I cannot express how much I loathed this book.  I apologize profusely for having recommended it, and I hang my head in shame if you actually went out and bought it.

I know there are all kinds of commentaries on the state of society and the plight of human beings.  There is much philosophy thrown in to enliven the boredom of a story where little happens.  There will be those who say – ‘stupid woman, you just don’t get it.’

But therein lies the problem.  I do get it, but I hate it anyway.

Two brothers – one a scientific genius, one a social drop out who is utterly obsessed with sex (don’t even get me started on the smut in this book – gratuitous and unnecessary.)

The novel follows their depressing, desperate lives as they find love, lose love, try and fail to have sex, and contemplate suicide.  You know what, within five minutes I hated them both, and that was my problem with this novel.  How can you enjoy a novel when you hate the two main characters.  I felt no sympathy for them, they were just two pathetic specimens trying their best in this mad world.  Who cares?

There were a few funny moments but God knows the novel needed them.

I know the point of a book review is to be objective and look for the balance.  Sorry I have failed miserably here.  I just don’t care enough.

Not one I would recommend.